Emerging Worlds

The Home & The World

Renya Ramirez

Renya Ramirez

Ho-Chunk Corn For Savory Soup

Mark Anderson

Mark Anderson

"The Black Power
We Wear"

Judith Habicht Mauche

Judith Habicht Mauche

New Pots For Turbulent Times

Nancy Chen

Nancy Chen

Rice and Taste:
On Savoring and Consuming

No one is completely isolated from emerging worlds. Yet we can't just turn on a dime to accommodate them either. We hold on to home traditions even as we appropriate changing materials, develo- ping situations, and new forms of power.

Native Americans in the United States were forced to allow their children to be sent off to cities for assimilation, yet cities were sources of continuing discrimination. Urban hubs reaching back and forth to the reservation became a form of collaborative survival. Reservation foods give comfort to dispersed tribal members.

Garifuna of Honduras argue against discrimination by claiming an affinity to

Black Americans, complete with the urban clothing styles that signal their cosmopolitan character. They build home pride in foreign shirts and shoes.

Fourteenth century Pueblo Indians faced dispersion; but newly reaggregated communities came up with distinctive innovations in pottery to call their own. From calamity, potters created a new public voice both at home and in wide regional connections.

Rice is both transnational and the taste of home. It is tied to folk traditions of food and healing—and to the latest in international expertise. It brings us into worlds of taste, local and global, always interweaving.